Forest CDM in indonesia
 

REDD - Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation


Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in which from herewith shall be referred to as REDD means all forest management activities in order to prevent and or decrease the deterioration of forest cover quantity and carbon stock through various activities to support sustainable national development.

Deforestation means the permanent alteration from forested area into a non-forested area as a result of human activities.

Forest degradation means the deterioration of forest cover quantity and carbon stock during a certain period of time as a result of human activities.

Reference Emission Level means the level of emission from deforestation and forest degradation in the condition of no existing REDD scheme and can be determined based on historical trend or future development scenario.

Carbon trading means trading service activities from forest management activities which results the reduction of emission from deforestation and forest degradation.

The aim of an REDD activity is to prevent and reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in order to enhance forest management.

The objective of an REDD activity is to reduce the occurrence of deforestation and forest degradation in order to achieve sustainable forest management and to increase the welfare of the people.

 




Causes of climate change
Impact Global Warming
Limited Global Warming
Agreement on global warming
Analyzing global warming
Kyoto Protocol
Greenhouse effect
Scientific research
Why climates vary
Ocean problems
Southern Ocean
Pacific Ocean
Ozone hole
Environmental problems by petroleum
Changes in the atmosphere
Increasing Temperatures
Can Earth Explode ?
NASA Study
El Nino
V
 
The Procedure Of Implementation Afforestation And Reforestation Project Under The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) In Indonesia
 
best

 


UNFCCC Climate Change Talks, 1st – 12th June 2009, Bonn


REDD should be designed to include the full range of options defined in the Bali Action Plan – conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks in developing countries.

IUCN welcomes the emerging consensus on the scope of forest-based mitigation options to be included in the post-2012 REDD regime, encompassing forest conservation, sustainable forest management and enhancement of forest carbon stocks, as identified in the Bali Action Plan (the ‘REDD+ option).

Forest Conservation

Significant emissions can be avoided through initiatives that lead to conservation of natural forest, particularly primary forest. “Conservation” includes policies and measures that avoid emissions from extant natural forest carbon stocks by preventing the introduction of land use activities that would cause emissions and deplete organic carbon stocks.

Conservation as a mitigation option is especially relevant in largely intact naturally forested landscapes, and can be achieved through a range of measures including: establishing protected areas and connectivity corridors; payments for ecosystem services including carbon storage and regulation of water supply and quality; recognising and rewarding community conserved areas and the promotion of forms of economic development that are compatible with mitigation.

IUCN believes that existing forest carbon stocks need to be included in the future REDD+ regime to avoid the risk that large-scale international leakage may occur to countries with historically low deforestation rates if only those forest nations that are currently experiencing high rates of deforestation participate3. Provision should be made to reward countries and communities that are already conserving, sustainably managing and expanding their natural forests, including high-forest, low-deforestation (HFLD) countries

Sustainable Management of Forests

Generally, forest-based mitigation options, such as those envisaged in the REDD+ regime, should be implemented as part of a national policy framework that promotes Sustainable Forest Management (SFM)4.

In landscapes where commercial or subsistence activities take place, such as logging, the “sustainable management of forests”5, when implemented through robust and credible frameworks can help reduce carbon emissions, increase sequestration of carbon, and enhance societal adaptation to climate change. At the same time, it can provide co-benefits including a supply of renewable forest products; reduced impacts on biodiversity; secure freshwater supplies and maintain and improve the livelihoods of forest dependent people.

The sustainable management of forests includes policies and measures (inter alia criteria and indicators, independent certification, low impact logging) that deliver economic returns while reducing long term and continuous carbon emissions.

Enhancement of forest carbon stocks

The REDD+ regime should also acknowledge the significant potential for enhancing forest carbon stocks through the restoration of degraded forests. There are 850 million hectares of degraded forest lands that are unlikely to be converted to another land-use. The UNFCCC estimates that the restoration of these lands could account for a saving of approximately 117 GtCO2e until 2030 – which is equivalent to one and a half times the estimated potential available from avoiding deforestation until 20306. Indeed the restoration of degraded forests offers a triple climate benefit, avoided emissions from further degradation, significant additional sequestration and enhanced ecosystem and livelihood resilience to the impacts of climate change. Also, employment opportunities generated by forest restoration activities can play an important role in supporting rural economic development.

IUCN recommends that a full range of options with respect to conservation, sustainable forest management and enhancement of forest carbon stocks be included in the future REDD+ mechanism;

IUCN recommends that climate change mitigation funds such as those envisaged under the future REDD+ mechanism will be most effective when they encourage the conservation, sustainable management, and restoration of natural forests.

IUCN also recommends that outstanding definitional issues with the purpose of including restoration of degraded forest lands in future REDD+ arrangements be resolved as part of SBSTA’s methodological work, drawing on ongoing work in other forest-related fora, such as the Collaborative Partnership on Forests.

<<< Prev   Next >>>
Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) in developing countries
REDD should be designed to include the full range of options defined in the Bali Action Plan
To be successful, the REDD+ regime should foster explicit linkages between nationally-owned forest governance processes and nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs)
Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in developing countries (REDD) - the link with wetlands
Wetlands and the REDD negotiations
Reduction emission from deforestation and forest degradation and sustainable development in Indonesia
 

Source :
INTERNATIONAL UNION FOR CONSERVATION OF NATURE
(IUCN). www.iucn.org/unfccc

     
Indonesia Forest Pictures Forest News Biodiversity
FOREST PICTURES FOREST NEWS BIODIVERSITY
     
The Clean Development Mechanism global warming Reducing emissions (REDD)
CDM GLOBAL WARMING REDD
     
heart attack influenza Cholesterol
HEART ATTACK INFLUENZA CHOLESTEROL